Questions to Ask Yourself Before Changing Jobs

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Changing Jobs

Thinking of changing companies, jobs, or careers entirely? 

My life coaching clients are often looking to make a change to their jobs or their entire career path.  As a coach, it is really important for me dig into what my client is looking to change specifically.  By helping my clients get clear on what they like and don’t like about their current job, we can explore a wider range of possibilities going forward.  From there, they can make an informed decision for themselves.

Digging in to what’s working and what’s not

When I coach my clients on their career, I dig into what has held them back from creating something different in their current role.  The reason I explore this with them, is to challenge them to be personally responsible for their happiness at work now and in the future. 

Sometimes a conversation, a request, or sharing feedback is all that is required to improve a work situation.  As a coach, I support my clients in communicating openly with their managers and teams, and requesting what they need to feel happy and empowered in their jobs.   And other times, my clients have exhausted all options and are ready to move on.

Here are some questions you can ask yourself to help clarify what you want:

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What is at the core of you wanting to make a change?

a lack of learning and development

  • a lack of opportunity to progress
  • dissatisfaction with your current manager or team
  • wanting to change industries or careers completely
  • increased salary expectations
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What is holding you back from creating the change you'd like to see in your current job? Have you tried:

  • driving your own personal and professional development
  • requesting a promotion or gaining clarity on why not
  • bringing up your concerns with your manager and/or coworkers
  • getting involved in projects that are aligned to where you want your career to go
  • requesting a salary increase
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    Still ready to move on?

    • What type of work would you like to be doing more of?
    • What kind of new skills and experiences are you seeking?
    • What kind of manager would you like to work for?
    • What’s your ideal company or industry?
    • What would you like to leave behind?

      One additional aspect to consider, is how can you make the most of your current role while you secure your next role?

      Are there ways to make your remaining time more productive or enjoyable?  Perhaps you can request to enrol in training or an external course?  Perhaps there are connections you could build that would support your future career?  Or perhaps focusing on specific people that you enjoy working with will make the overall experience better.  

      All the best in creating work to be meaningful, satifying and fulfilling!

      Personal Responsibility and Your Career

      Personal Responsibility and Your Career

      Before you make a change to your career, job, or company, it’s crucial to understand personal responsibility.

      Personal responsbility is being the author of your own life.  It means being accountable for your actions, decisions, experiences and outcomes.   

      Being personally responsible at work, means taking action to address whatever issues come up for you.  It means, your job satisfaction is entirely in your hands.  By understanding personal responsibility at work, you won’t change jobs just to find yourself facing the same issues in the future.  

      What gets in the way of personal responsibility at work?

       

      Here are some common factors:

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      not drivingyour own personal and professional self development

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      being focused on issues rather than coming up with possible solutions

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      feeling disempowered, and playing the victim

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      choosing to be ‘nice’ to your managers and coworkers over being honest with them

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      fear of ruffling feathers or challenging the status quo

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      not understanding the company’s big picture and your value in achieving success

      How can you get back into the drivers seat at work?

      Here are some strategies to bring back personal responsibility to your job:

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      get curious – if you don’t understand something or have a different point of view, ask questions for clarification and understanding

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      listen to your managers and coworkers – quiet your mind and really listen to what they are saying, use questions to check for understanding

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      share your opinions with respect – let your colleagues know you want to find the best way forward, and you have concerns or other possible solutions

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      use face to face communication often, especially when you first start working with a team so you get to know one another as people and gain more context with intonation and body language

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      take a break daily – make sure you get up from your desk to move around or go for a walk at lunch to refresh

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      use the underlying assumption that everyone is doing their best – coming from this place enables communication and empowers others to live into that belief

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      let go – if there is a decision out of your control that you do not agree with; voice your concerns, respect the final decision, and let it go

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      don’t let your ego get involved – your ego will try to make you right and others wrong rather than using teamwork to find the best way forward

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      drive your own develop – ask for more responsbility, a new project, or to enrol in a course

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      use your annual leave – longer breaks where you can totally switch off from work are essential for your mental and emotional wellbeing

      When you understand how to be more personally responsible at work, you choose your own happiness. 

      Sometimes implementing the strategies above will enable you to fall in love with your current job, and other times it highlights the need to move on.  Either way, you are back in control and you create your experiences now and in the future.